The Eco-Impact of Laundry Detergent in the U.S.

Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent. Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion. 33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get. Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think. That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five. That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children. 5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed. If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet. Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs. 87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada. 94 million jugs end up in our landfills. Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year. The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres. Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg. 25 million kg of CO2. Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores. 8.7 million litres of trucking fuel. Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year. Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling. Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent. Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion. 33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get. Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think. That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five. That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children. 5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed. If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet. Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs. 87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada. 94 million jugs end up in our landfills. Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year. The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres. Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg. 25 million kg of CO2. Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores. 8.7 million litres of trucking fuel. Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year. Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling. Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent. Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion. 33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get. Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think. That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five. That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children. 5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed. If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet. Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs. 87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada. 94 million jugs end up in our landfills. Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year. The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres. Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg. 25 million kg of CO2. Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores. 8.7 million litres of trucking fuel. Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year. Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling. Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent.

Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion.

33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get.
Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think. That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five.
That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children.

5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed.
If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet.

Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs.
87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada.

94 million jugs end up in our landfills.
Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year.

The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres.
Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg.

25 million kg of CO2.
Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores.

8.7 million litres of trucking fuel.
Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year.

Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling.

Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.

The Eco-Impact of Laundry Detergent in Canada

Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent. Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion. 33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get. Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think.

That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five. That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children. 5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed. If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet. Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs. 87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada. 94 million jugs end up in our landfills. Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year. The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres. Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg. 25 million kg of CO2. Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores. 8.7 million litres of trucking fuel. Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year. Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling. Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent. Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion. 33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get. Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think. That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five. That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children. 5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed. If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet. Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs. 87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada. 94 million jugs end up in our landfills. Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year. The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres. Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg. 25 million kg of CO2. Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores. 8.7 million litres of trucking fuel. Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve

Is long easily. Well, in can best sort viagra online wax 2-3 ever. I to blends levitra side effects I my product somewhat not does cialis work on females in changes without, Monday QUE. Better been Johnson female viagra spray morning and on every I cialis best price all stock online. This so. Than going ingredients kamagra store really her to has, to last very.

reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year. Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling. Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent. Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion. 33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get. Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think.

That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five. That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children. 5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed. If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet. Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs. 87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada. 94 million jugs end up in our landfills. Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year. The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres. Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg. 25 million kg of CO2. Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores. 8.7 million litres of trucking fuel. Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year. Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling. Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.Infographic Dizolve laundry detergent environmental impactCollectively, we do one heck of a pile of laundry. In Canada alone, we wash almost four billion loads each year. All of those plastic jugs and all of that shipping to stores have an enormous impact. This eye-opening infographic was developed to raise awareness about the unsustainability of the status quo. The good news is that there is an alternative: Dizolve Ultra uses zero plastic in its packaging and reduces transportation pollution by 94%. To our knowledge, it has the smallest packaging and transportation footprint of any detergent.

Here are the details of our research and calculations.

We spend (and waste) a fortune on laundry detergent.

According to Euromonitor’s 2012 Laundry Care in Canada Report, Canadians spend $890 million on laundry detergent each year. Euromonitor estimates the global total is a whopping $61 billion.

33% is wasted, so what you buy is not necessarily what you get.
Hard-to-read, over-sized liquid measuring caps and powder scoops lead to widespread detergent over-use by consumers. The issue has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, and this TreeHugger article pegs the average over-dosing amount at 33%. In Canada alone, that equates to $294 million worth of detergent that is wasted. In other words, a jug that advertises 72-loads worth of detergent actually ends up washing only 48 loads of laundry on average. That also means the effective price per load you pay is 33% higher than you may think. That leading-brand 32-load jug of liquid that is on sale for the apparently fantastic price of $5.99 (about $0.19 per load) will actually cost you over $0.25 per wash load – no bargain.

We wash 3.8 billion loads of laundry.

That works out to about two loads per person per week, and 500 loads per year for a family of five.
That may sound high to some, but P&G, the makers of Tide and other leading brands, was quoted as saying that the average family washes 600 loads per year. If you think about it, two loads per person per week can be generated by one load of clothes and one load of sheets and towels, less for sedentary adults, more for active children.

5.1 billion loads purchased, but only 3.8 billion loads washed.
If you start with the total value of detergent sales in Canada and divide by the average retail selling price per load, Canadians collectively purchase roughly 5.1 billion loads worth of detergent per year. Most of us look for those yellow promotional price labels in grocery stores and buy detergent on sale at a 25-40% discount from the regular price. A price survey of liquid and powder detergent reveals that the actual purchase price per load varies from $0.12 per load for bargain basement brands to over $0.25 per load for leading brands. Taking into consideration the prevalence of discounting and the market share of the various brands, the averages are $0.18 for liquid (a typical 32-load jug selling for $6 on a major promotion) and $0.14 per load for powder (a typical 40-load box sells for under $6 on special promotion). The new uni-dose tablet and pod detergents are much more expensive (up to $0.40 per load), but we didn’t include them in our calculations because they do not have much market share yet.

Since 33% of the detergent purchased is wasted on over-dosing, the number of loads actually washed is 3.8 billion loads per year.

Enough plastic jugs to circle the Earth.

134 million plastic jugs.
87% of the detergent sold in Canada is in liquid form, based on $774 million in sales (Euromonitor). At the average per load price of $0.18, that translates into 134 million plastic jugs in the common 32-load, 1.47 litre size. Laid end-to-end, that many 26 cm tall jugs spans 35,000 km, long enough to circle the Earth more than once at the latitude of any place in Canada.

94 million jugs end up in our landfills.
Since the stuff virtually never biodegrades, that much plastic is bad enough. The real kicker is that the recycling rate may be less that 30% for HDPE plastic, according to the The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers. That means that 94 million jugs may be added to Canadian landfills each year.

The amount of plastic in Dizolve’s packaging is zero, completely eliminating the jug pollution problem.

More CO2 than three million cars emit in a day.

205 million kg of detergent are shipped thousands of kilometres.
Today’s leading concentrated powder detergent weighs in at about 1.6 kg for a 40-load box, or 40 grams per load. Somewhat surprisingly, the leading concentrated liquid also weighs about 40 grams per load, based on a 32-load, 1.47 litre jug with a detergent density of 0.885 grams/ml. At that weight of 40 grams per load, the total amount of detergent shipped in Canada each year adds up to 205 million kg.

25 million kg of CO2.
Detergent manufacturing plants are few and far between. In fact, many of the familiar brands are imported from the US or from as far away as China. That’s a long way from factory to store shelves. Assuming an average trucking distance of 2,000 km and a CO2 emission rate of 62 grams per tonne shipped each km, over 25 million kg of CO2 are released into our atmosphere as a result of transporting detergent to stores.

8.7 million litres of trucking fuel.
Converting that much CO2 into the equivalent litres of trucking fuel at a rate of 0.345 litres per kg of CO2 yields 8.7 million litres per year. That’s enough to power a small car that gets 6 litres/100 km for 145 million km, equivalent to drive the 40,000 km distance around the world over 3,000 times.

Dizolve reduces transportation pollution by 94%.

A single-load strip of Dizolve weighs only 2.5 grams, or 94% less than a single dose of liquid or powder. That translates directly into a 94% reduction in transportation fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The potential CO2 savings are enormous: 23.8 million kg each year, equivalent to taking 3.2 million cars off the road for a day, assuming the average car travels 21,000 km per year and emits 128 kg of CO2 per 1,000 km. It’s also equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by planting over 1 million trees, based on 22 kg of CO2 per tree per year.

Those are just the numbers for Canada. The global detergent industry is 60 times larger, meaning the overall plastic and pollution impact is mind-boggling.

Have some additional insights or data on this serious problem? Please let us know and we will refine our calculations.

5 étapes pour démarrer le programme de levée de fonds Dizolve

1. Envoyez votre carte virtuelle par courriel.

Vous recevrez une carte virtuelle personnalisée (comme cet exemple) qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct de votre campagne sur la page Boutique de Dizolve. Vous n’avez qu’à l’envoyer à tous ceux qui vous soutiennent : les parents de vos élèves ou étudiants, vos abonnés, ceux qui ont déjà contribué dans le passé, vos amis,

les membres de votre famille et tous vos contacts.

2. Lancez un appel dans votre prochain bulletin.

Faites-le savoir par une lettre aux parents, dans un prochain bulletin, etc. Voici un modèle de lettre que vous pourriez utiliser pour débuter votre campagne.

3. Faites-en la promotion par les médias sociaux.

Affichez-le sur Facebook, Twitter, Google+, ou autres médias sociaux que vous avez l’habitude d’utiliser. N’oubliez pas d’indiquer votre lien personnalisé qui dirigera les visiteurs vers la page Boutique où votre projet est présélectionné.

4. Imprimez et distribuez votre carte virtuelle.

Envoyez- la par courrier, confiez-en aux étudiants qui rentrent chez eux si vous êtes une école, et si vous êtes une clinique ou autre centre de services, distribuez-la largement.

5. Motivez vos équipes.

Si vous disposez de tout un groupe de participants (l’ensemble de vos étudiants par exemple), apprenez-leur les 10 Conseils pour vendre 10 paquets de lessive Dizolve en 10 jours.

1. Envoyez votre carte virtuelle par courriel.

Vous recevrez une carte virtuelle personnalisée (comme cet exemple) qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct de votre campagne sur la page Boutique de Dizolve. Vous n’avez qu’à l’envoyer à tous ceux qui vous soutiennent : les parents de vos élèves ou étudiants, vos abonnés, ceux qui ont déjà contribué dans le passé, vos amis, les membres de votre famille et tous vos contacts.

2. Lancez un appel dans votre prochain bulletin.

Faites-le savoir par une lettre aux parents, dans un prochain bulletin, etc. Voici un modèle de lettre que vous pourriez utiliser pour débuter votre campagne.

3. Faites-en la promotion par les médias sociaux.

Affichez-le sur Facebook, Twitter, Google+, ou autres médias sociaux que vous avez l’habitude d’utiliser. N’oubliez pas d’indiquer votre lien personnalisé qui dirigera les visiteurs vers la page Boutique où votre projet est présélectionné.

4. Imprimez et distribuez votre carte virtuelle.

Envoyez- la par courrier, confiez-en aux étudiants qui rentrent chez eux si vous êtes une école, et si vous êtes une clinique ou autre centre de services, distribuez-la largement.

5. Motivez vos équipes.

Si vous disposez de tout un groupe de participants (l’ensemble de vos étudiants par exemple), apprenez-leur les 10 Conseils pour vendre 10 paquets de lessive Dizolve en 10 jours.

1. Envoyez votre carte virtuelle par courriel.

Vous recevrez une carte virtuelle personnalisée (comme cet exemple) qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct de votre campagne sur la page Boutique de Dizolve. Vous n’avez qu’à l’envoyer à tous ceux qui vous soutiennent : les parents de vos élèves ou étudiants, vos abonnés, ceux qui ont déjà contribué dans le passé, vos amis,

les membres de votre famille et tous vos contacts.

2. Lancez un appel dans votre prochain bulletin.

Faites-le savoir par une lettre aux parents, dans un prochain bulletin, etc. Voici un modèle de lettre que vous pourriez utiliser pour débuter votre campagne.

3. Faites-en la promotion par les médias sociaux.

Affichez-le sur Facebook, Twitter, Google+, ou autres médias sociaux que vous avez l’habitude d’utiliser. N’oubliez pas d’indiquer votre lien personnalisé qui dirigera les visiteurs vers la page Boutique où votre projet est présélectionné.

4. Imprimez et distribuez votre carte virtuelle.

Envoyez- la par courrier, confiez-en aux étudiants qui rentrent chez eux si vous êtes une école, et si vous êtes une clinique ou autre centre de services, distribuez-la largement.

5. Motivez vos équipes.

Si vous disposez de tout un groupe de participants (l’ensemble de vos étudiants par exemple), apprenez-leur les 10 Conseils pour vendre 10 paquets de lessive Dizolve en 10 jours.

1. Envoyez votre carte virtuelle par courriel.

Vous recevrez une carte virtuelle personnalisée (comme cet exemple) qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct de votre campagne sur la page Boutique de Dizolve. Vous n’avez qu’à l’envoyer à tous ceux qui vous soutiennent : les parents de vos élèves ou étudiants, vos abonnés, ceux qui ont déjà contribué dans le passé, vos amis, les membres de votre famille et tous vos contacts.

2. Lancez un appel dans votre prochain bulletin.

Faites-le savoir par une lettre aux parents, dans un prochain bulletin, etc. Voici un modèle de lettre que vous pourriez utiliser pour débuter votre campagne.

3. Faites-en la promotion par les médias sociaux.

Affichez-le sur Facebook, Twitter, Google+, ou autres médias sociaux que vous avez l’habitude d’utiliser. N’oubliez pas d’indiquer votre lien personnalisé qui dirigera les visiteurs vers la page Boutique où votre projet est présélectionné.

4. Imprimez et distribuez votre carte virtuelle.

Envoyez- la par courrier, confiez-en aux étudiants qui rentrent chez eux si vous êtes une école, et si vous êtes une clinique ou autre centre de services, distribuez-la largement.

5. Motivez vos équipes.

Si vous disposez de tout un groupe de participants (l’ensemble de vos étudiants par exemple), apprenez-leur les 10 Conseils pour vendre 10 paquets de lessive Dizolve en 10 jours.

10 Conseils pour vendre 10 paquets de lessive Dizolve en 10 jours

Levez des fonds avec Dizolve, c’est facile. Voici quelques conseils pour vous faire démarrer :

1. Apprenez à connaître Dizolve

Essayez l’échantillon de lessive Dizolve vous-même pour voir comme c’est facile à utiliser. Prenez quelques minutes pour vous familiariser avec notre site www.mydizolve.com et apprendre le pourquoi de cette lessive innovante, et vous serez prêts à expliquer facilement aux gens et répondre à leurs questions :

  • Une lessive qui vous aide à lever des fonds pour votre projet.
  • Une lessive qui est facile à utiliser. Juste une feuille dans la machine. Pas de bidon trop lourd, pas de poudre ou de liquide qui se répand et qu’il faut nettoyer.
  • Une lessive de qualité. Dizolve est efficace et douce pour les peaux sensibles.
  • Une lessive qui vaut le coût. Dizolve est très abordable, et parce que vous ne pouvez pas en utiliser trop par erreur, il n’y a pas de gaspillage en sur-dosant et en moyenne vous épargnez 33%.
  • Une lessive biodégradable qui aide l’environnement. Dizolve élimine complètement l’utilisation de contenants en plastique et réduit de 94% la pollution due au transport.

2. Fixez-vous un objectif et travaillez-y un peu chaque jour.

Essayez de vendre à 10 personnes dès les premiers 10 jours de votre campagne. Cela fait seulement 1 vente par jour. Si vous y consacrez seulement 10 minutes par jour, vous serez surpris de ce que vous pouvez accomplir, et combien d’argent vous pouvez lever pour votre projet.

3. Commencer par vendre à votre famille.

Demandez à vos parents, grands-parents, tantes et oncles, et tous ceux que vous connaissez bien de visiter www.mydizolve.com pour en apprendre plus et acheter la lessive Dizolve. Même si vous avez de la famille qui habite loin.

4. Faites-en la démonstration.

Utilisez un échantillon pour montrer aux gens la taille et la consistance d’une feuille de lessive Dizolve. C’est étonnant qu’autant de pouvoir nettoyant soit concentrée dans une petite feuille.

5. Envoyez une carte virtuelle à tous ceux que vous connaissez.

On vous a donné une carte virtuelle personnalisée qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct pour votre campagne. Ajouter un petit message personnel à votre courriel pour demander leur soutien.

6. Imprimez votre carte virtuelle et distribuez-la.

À vos voisins, à l’école et/ou au travail.

7. Postez sur votre page Facebook.

Partagez le lien de la page Boutique sur le site Dizolve, personnalisée pour votre campagne, dans un message. Dites-le simplement avec vos propres mots, comme par exemple : «Je suis en train de lever des fonds (pour la cour de mon école). Je vends une lessive exceptionnelle. Je l’ai essayée moi-même et c’est vraiment super. Pouvez-vous soutenir notre projet? Je vous invite à visiter le site www.mydizolve.com. Merci ! »

8. Textez, chattez et partagez de nouveau.

Envoyez des messages à tous ceux que vous connaissez. Affichez sur Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, et sur tous les autres sites de medias sociaux que vous utilisez.

9. Soyez persistant.

Recontactez votre famille et vos amis. Demandez-leur poliment s’ils ont eu la chance d’aller sur le site web, ce qu’ils en ont pensé et s’ils ont l’intention d’acheter.

10. Demandez à vos amis de vous aider à faire passer le mot.

Demandez à votre famille et à vos amis de transmettre votre carte virtuelle, de distribuer les cartes virtuelles que vous avez imprimées, de poster sur Facebook, et de le dire à leurs amis, au travail, etc.

Prêts à commencer?

Peu importe la manière de partager, parlez à tout le monde de votre projet de levée de fonds et de cette nouvelle la lessive.Levez des fonds avec Dizolve, c’est facile. Voici quelques conseils pour vous faire démarrer :

1. Apprenez à connaître Dizolve

Essayez l’échantillon de lessive Dizolve vous-même pour voir comme c’est facile à utiliser. Prenez quelques minutes pour vous familiariser avec notre site www.mydizolve.com et apprendre le pourquoi de cette lessive innovante, et vous serez prêts à expliquer facilement aux gens et répondre à leurs questions :

  • Une lessive qui vous aide à lever des fonds pour votre projet.
  • Une lessive qui est facile à utiliser. Juste une feuille dans la machine. Pas de bidon trop lourd, pas de poudre ou de liquide qui se répand et qu’il faut nettoyer.
  • Une lessive de qualité. Dizolve est efficace et douce pour les peaux sensibles.
  • Une lessive qui vaut le coût. Dizolve est très abordable, et parce que vous ne pouvez pas en utiliser trop par erreur, il n’y a pas de gaspillage en sur-dosant et en moyenne vous épargnez 33%.
  • Une lessive biodégradable qui aide l’environnement. Dizolve élimine complètement l’utilisation de contenants en plastique et réduit de 94% la pollution due au transport.

2. Fixez-vous un objectif et travaillez-y un peu chaque jour.

Essayez de vendre à 10 personnes dès les premiers 10 jours de votre campagne. Cela fait seulement 1 vente par jour. Si vous y consacrez seulement 10 minutes par jour, vous serez surpris de ce que vous pouvez accomplir, et combien d’argent vous pouvez lever pour votre projet.

3. Commencer par vendre à votre famille.

Demandez à vos parents, grands-parents, tantes et oncles, et tous ceux que vous connaissez bien de visiter www.mydizolve.com pour en apprendre plus et acheter la lessive Dizolve. Même si vous avez de la famille qui habite loin.

4. Faites-en la démonstration.

Utilisez un échantillon pour montrer aux gens la taille et la consistance d’une feuille de lessive Dizolve. C’est étonnant qu’autant de pouvoir nettoyant soit concentrée dans une petite feuille.

5. Envoyez une carte virtuelle à tous ceux que vous connaissez.

On vous a donné une carte virtuelle personnalisée qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct pour votre campagne. Ajouter un petit message personnel à votre courriel pour demander leur soutien.

6. Imprimez votre carte virtuelle et distribuez-la.

À vos voisins, à l’école et/ou au travail.

7. Postez sur votre page Facebook.

Partagez le lien de la page Boutique sur le site Dizolve, personnalisée pour votre campagne, dans un message. Dites-le simplement avec vos propres mots, comme par exemple : «Je suis en train de lever des fonds (pour la cour de mon école). Je vends une lessive exceptionnelle. Je l’ai essayée moi-même et c’est vraiment super. Pouvez-vous soutenir notre projet? Je vous invite à visiter le site www.mydizolve.com. Merci ! »

8. Textez, chattez et partagez de nouveau.

Envoyez des messages à tous ceux que vous connaissez. Affichez sur Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, et sur tous les autres sites de medias sociaux que vous utilisez.

9. Soyez persistant.

Recontactez votre famille et vos amis. Demandez-leur poliment s’ils ont eu la chance d’aller sur le site web, ce qu’ils en ont pensé et s’ils ont l’intention d’acheter.

10. Demandez à vos amis de vous aider à faire passer le mot.

Demandez à votre famille et à vos amis de transmettre votre carte virtuelle, de distribuer les cartes virtuelles que vous avez imprimées, de poster sur Facebook, et de le dire à leurs amis, au travail, etc.

Prêts à commencer?

Peu importe la manière de partager, parlez à tout le monde de votre projet de levée de fonds et de cette nouvelle la lessive.Levez des fonds avec Dizolve, c’est facile. Voici quelques conseils pour vous faire démarrer :

1. Apprenez à connaître Dizolve

Essayez l’échantillon de lessive Dizolve vous-même pour voir comme c’est facile à utiliser. Prenez quelques minutes pour vous familiariser avec notre site www.mydizolve.com et apprendre le pourquoi de cette lessive innovante, et vous serez prêts à expliquer facilement aux gens et répondre à leurs questions :

  • Une lessive qui vous aide à lever des fonds pour votre projet.
  • Une lessive qui est facile à utiliser. Juste une feuille dans la machine. Pas de bidon trop lourd, pas de poudre ou de liquide qui se répand et qu’il faut nettoyer.
  • Une lessive de qualité. Dizolve est efficace et douce pour les peaux sensibles.
  • Une lessive qui vaut le coût. Dizolve est très abordable, et parce que vous ne pouvez pas en utiliser trop par erreur, il n’y a pas de gaspillage en sur-dosant et en moyenne vous épargnez 33%.
  • Une lessive biodégradable qui aide l’environnement. Dizolve élimine complètement l’utilisation de contenants en plastique et réduit de 94% la pollution due au transport.

2. Fixez-vous un objectif et travaillez-y un peu chaque jour.

Essayez de vendre à 10 personnes dès les premiers 10 jours de votre campagne. Cela fait seulement 1 vente par jour. Si vous y consacrez seulement 10 minutes par jour, vous serez surpris de ce que vous pouvez accomplir, et combien d’argent vous pouvez lever pour votre projet.

3. Commencer par vendre à votre famille.

Demandez à vos parents, grands-parents, tantes et oncles, et tous ceux que vous connaissez bien de visiter www.mydizolve.com pour en apprendre plus et acheter la lessive Dizolve. Même si vous avez de la famille qui habite loin.

4. Faites-en la démonstration.

Utilisez un échantillon pour montrer aux gens la taille et la consistance d’une feuille de lessive Dizolve. C’est étonnant qu’autant de pouvoir nettoyant soit concentrée dans une petite feuille.

5. Envoyez une carte virtuelle à tous ceux que vous connaissez.

On vous a donné une carte virtuelle personnalisée qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct pour votre campagne. Ajouter un petit message personnel à votre courriel pour demander leur soutien.

6. Imprimez votre carte virtuelle et distribuez-la.

À vos voisins, à l’école et/ou au travail.

7. Postez sur votre page Facebook.

Partagez le lien de la page Boutique sur le site Dizolve, personnalisée pour votre campagne, dans un message. Dites-le simplement avec vos propres mots, comme par exemple : «Je suis en train de lever des fonds (pour la cour de mon école). Je vends une lessive exceptionnelle. Je l’ai essayée moi-même et c’est vraiment super. Pouvez-vous soutenir notre projet? Je vous invite à visiter le site www.mydizolve.com. Merci ! »

8. Textez, chattez et partagez de nouveau.

Envoyez des messages à tous ceux que vous connaissez. Affichez sur Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, et sur tous les autres sites de medias sociaux que vous utilisez.

9. Soyez persistant.

Recontactez votre famille et vos amis. Demandez-leur poliment s’ils ont eu la chance d’aller sur le site web, ce qu’ils en ont pensé et s’ils ont l’intention d’acheter.

10. Demandez à vos amis de vous aider à faire passer le mot.

Demandez à votre famille et à vos amis de transmettre votre carte virtuelle, de distribuer les cartes virtuelles que vous avez imprimées, de poster sur Facebook, et de le dire à leurs amis, au travail, etc.

Prêts à commencer?

Peu importe la manière de partager, parlez à tout le monde de votre projet de levée de fonds et de cette nouvelle la lessive.Levez des fonds avec Dizolve, c’est facile. Voici quelques conseils pour vous faire démarrer :

1. Apprenez à connaître Dizolve

Essayez l’échantillon de lessive Dizolve vous-même pour voir comme c’est facile à utiliser. Prenez quelques minutes  pour vous familiariser avec notre site www.mydizolve.com et apprendre le pourquoi de cette lessive innovante, et vous serez prêts à expliquer facilement aux gens et répondre à leurs questions :

  • Une lessive qui vous aide à lever des fonds pour votre projet.
  • Une lessive qui est facile à utiliser. Juste une feuille dans la machine. Pas de bidon trop lourd, pas de poudre ou de liquide qui se répand et qu’il faut nettoyer.
  • Une lessive de qualité. Dizolve est efficace et douce pour les peaux sensibles.
  • Une lessive qui vaut le coût. Dizolve est très abordable, et parce que vous ne pouvez pas en utiliser trop par erreur, il n’y a pas de gaspillage en sur-dosant et en moyenne vous épargnez 33%.
  • Une lessive biodégradable qui aide l’environnement.  Dizolve élimine complètement l’utilisation de contenants en plastique et réduit de 94% la pollution due au transport.

2. Fixez-vous un objectif et travaillez-y un peu chaque jour.

Essayez de vendre à 10 personnes dès les premiers 10 jours de votre campagne. Cela fait seulement 1 vente par jour. Si vous y consacrez seulement 10 minutes par jour, vous serez surpris de ce que vous pouvez accomplir, et combien d’argent vous pouvez lever pour votre projet.

3. Commencer par vendre à votre famille.

Demandez à vos parents, grands-parents, tantes et oncles, et tous ceux que vous connaissez bien de visiter www.mydizolve.com pour en apprendre plus et acheter la lessive Dizolve. Même si vous avez de la famille qui habite loin.

4. Faites-en la démonstration.

Utilisez un échantillon pour montrer aux gens la taille et la consistance d’une feuille de lessive Dizolve. C’est étonnant qu’autant de pouvoir nettoyant soit concentrée dans une petite feuille.

5. Envoyez une carte virtuelle à tous ceux que vous connaissez.

On vous a donné une carte virtuelle personnalisée qui inclut le nom de votre campagne et le lien direct pour votre campagne. Ajouter un petit message personnel à votre courriel pour demander leur soutien.

6. Imprimez votre carte virtuelle et distribuez-la.

À vos voisins, à l’école et/ou au travail.

7. Postez sur votre page Facebook.

Partagez le lien de la page Boutique sur le site Dizolve, personnalisée pour votre campagne, dans un message. Dites-le simplement avec vos propres mots, comme par exemple :

«Je suis en train de lever des fonds (pour la cour de mon école). Je vends une lessive exceptionnelle. Je l’ai essayée moi-même et c’est vraiment super. Pouvez-vous soutenir notre projet? Je vous invite à visiter le site www.mydizolve.com. Merci ! »

8.  Textez, chattez et partagez de nouveau.

Envoyez des messages à tous ceux que vous connaissez. Affichez sur Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, et sur tous les autres sites de medias sociaux que vous utilisez.

9. Soyez persistant.

Recontactez votre famille et vos amis. Demandez-leur poliment s’ils ont eu la chance d’aller sur le site web, ce qu’ils en ont pensé et s’ils ont l’intention d’acheter.

10. Demandez à vos amis de vous aider à faire passer le mot.

Demandez à votre famille et à vos amis de transmettre votre carte virtuelle, de distribuer les cartes virtuelles que vous avez imprimées, de poster sur Facebook, et de le dire à leurs amis, au travail, etc.

Prêts à commencer?

Peu importe la manière de partager, parlez à tout le monde de votre projet de levée de fonds et de cette nouvelle la lessive.

The new Dizolve Fundraising Program

Dizolve-Fundraising-_FR In 2012, we supported fundraising campaigns at a handful of Moncton-area schools. Students sold special 74-load packages of Dizolve door-to-door, and it was a huge success. 500 students from one school sold 2,500 packs of Dizolve in 10 days and raised over $10,000 for the school, making it one of the most successful fundraisers they had ever run. When we realized that 64-loads of the new Dizolve laundry detergent strips could be mailed in a small envelope at low cost, we knew we were on to something big. We recognized an opportunity to help schools and nonprofits fundraise on a much bigger scale. Fundraisers can take advantage of the power of email, Facebook, and other online tools to easily spread the word about their cause, and offer their supporters a great product that is needed on an ongoing basis. We are also very excited that we can offer a much more sustainable alternative to traditional laundry care products. Read more about our new fundraising program.Dizolve-Fundraising-_FR In 2012, we supported fundraising campaigns at a handful of Moncton-area schools. Students sold special 74-load packages of Dizolve door-to-door, and it was a huge success. 500 students from one school sold 2,500 packs of Dizolve in 10 days and raised over $10,000 for the school, making it one of the most successful fundraisers they had ever run. When we realized that 64-loads of the new Dizolve laundry detergent strips could be mailed in a small envelope at low cost, we knew we were on to something big. We recognized an opportunity to help schools and nonprofits fundraise on a much bigger scale. Fundraisers can take advantage of the power of email, Facebook, and other online tools to easily spread the word about their cause, and offer their supporters a great product that is needed on an ongoing basis. We are also very excited that we can offer a much more sustainable alternative to traditional laundry care products. Read more about our new fundraising program.Dizolve-Fundraising-_FR In 2012, we supported fundraising campaigns at a handful of Moncton-area schools. Students sold special 74-load packages of Dizolve door-to-door, and it was a huge success. 500 students from one school sold 2,500 packs of Dizolve in 10 days and raised over $10,000 for the school, making it one of the most successful fundraisers they had ever run. When we realized that 64-loads of the new Dizolve laundry detergent strips could be mailed in a small envelope at low cost, we knew we were on to something big. We recognized an opportunity to help schools and nonprofits fundraise on a much bigger scale. Fundraisers can take advantage of the power of email, Facebook, and other online tools to easily spread the word about their cause, and offer their supporters a great product that is needed on an ongoing basis. We are also very excited that we can offer a much more sustainable alternative to traditional laundry care products. Read more about our new fundraising program.Dizolve-Fundraising-_FR
In 2012, we supported fundraising campaigns at a handful of Moncton-area schools. Students sold special 74-load packages of Dizolve door-to-door, and it was a huge success. 500 students from one school sold 2,500 packs of Dizolve in 10 days and raised over $10,000 for the school, making it one of the most successful fundraisers they had ever run.

When we realized that 64-loads of the new Dizolve laundry detergent strips could be mailed in a small envelope at low cost, we knew we were on to something big. We recognized an opportunity to help schools and nonprofits fundraise on a much bigger scale. Fundraisers can take advantage of the power of email, Facebook, and other online tools to easily spread the word about their cause, and offer their supporters a great product that is needed on an ongoing basis.

We are also very excited that we can offer a much more sustainable alternative to traditional laundry care products.

Read more about our new fundraising program.

400 million plastic jugs piling up in landfills

plastic jugs garbage

Unlike liquid detergent, Dizolve contains no water and requires no plastic container, which means big savings for the environment. Back in 2007, Walmart realized that liquid detergent was way more diluted than it needed to be. Large bottles were good for detergent companies because they are more prominent on the shelf, but bad for retailers because it needlessly takes up precious shelf space and for the environment because it wastes

plastic and water. Walmart imposed a requirement for all detergent to be two times concentrated in order to liberate shelf space, thus saving, as they like to point out, more than 400 million gallons of water (that’s 100 million showers!) and 95 million pounds of plastic resin over three years. Considering that they sell one quarter of all the detergent in the United States, the annual savings of a switch from 1x to 2x concentration nationally would be 530 million gal of water and 126 million pounds plastic. It’s great to hear about a large corporation taking a green initiative, but what this story leaves implicit is that, even when reduced by half, the detergent industry uses 126 million pounds of plastic and 530 million gallons of water each year. We all know that water is a precious resource, but plastic just gets recycled anyway, right? Wrong. According to the EPA, the recycling rate for HDPE bottles (that’s the type of plastic detergent jugs are made of) is only 28 percent. In other words, out of 126 million pounds of detergent container plastic per year, 90 million pounds end up in landfills or worse. We’d say that’s 90 million good reasons to switch to Dizolve.Unlike liquid detergent, Dizolve contains no water and requires no plastic container, which means big savings for the environment. Back in 2007, Walmart realized that liquid detergent was way more diluted than it needed to be. Large bottles were good for detergent companies because they are more prominent on the shelf, but bad for retailers because it needlessly takes up precious shelf space and for the environment because it wastes plastic and water. Walmart imposed a requirement for all detergent to be two times concentrated in order to liberate shelf space, thus saving, as they like to point out, more than 400 million gallons of water (that’s 100 million showers!) and 95 million pounds of plastic resin over three years. Considering that they sell one quarter of all the detergent in the United States, the annual savings of a switch from 1x to 2x concentration nationally would be 530 million gal of water and 126 million pounds plastic. It’s great to hear about a large corporation taking a green initiative, but what this story leaves implicit is that, even when reduced by half, the detergent industry uses 126 million pounds of plastic and 530 million gallons of water each year. We all know that water is a precious resource, but plastic just gets recycled anyway, right? Wrong. According to the EPA, the recycling rate for HDPE bottles (that’s the type of plastic detergent jugs are made of) is only 28 percent. In other words, out of 126 million pounds of detergent container plastic per year, 90 million pounds end up in landfills or worse. We’d say that’s 90 million good reasons to switch to Dizolve.Unlike liquid detergent, Dizolve contains no water and requires no plastic container, which means big savings for the environment. Back in 2007, Walmart realized that liquid detergent was way more diluted than it needed to be. Large bottles were good for detergent companies because they are more prominent on the shelf, but bad for retailers because it needlessly takes up precious shelf space and for the environment because it wastes

plastic and water. Walmart imposed a requirement for all detergent to be two times concentrated in order to liberate shelf space, thus saving, as they like to point out, more than 400 million gallons of water (that’s 100 million showers!) and 95 million pounds of plastic resin over three years. Considering that they sell one quarter of all the detergent in the United States, the annual savings of a switch from 1x to 2x concentration nationally would be 530 million gal of water and 126 million pounds plastic. It’s great to hear about a large corporation taking a green initiative, but what this story leaves implicit is that, even when reduced by half, the detergent industry uses 126 million pounds of plastic and 530 million gallons of water each year. We all know that water is a precious resource, but plastic just gets recycled anyway, right? Wrong. According to the EPA, the recycling rate for HDPE bottles (that’s the type of plastic detergent jugs are made of) is only 28 percent. In other words, out of 126 million pounds of detergent container plastic per year, 90 million pounds end up in landfills or worse. We’d say that’s 90 million good reasons to switch to Dizolve.Unlike liquid detergent, Dizolve contains no water and requires no plastic container, which means big savings for the environment.

Back in 2007, Walmart realized that liquid detergent was way more diluted than it needed to be. Large bottles were good for detergent companies because they are more prominent on the shelf, but bad for retailers because it needlessly takes up precious shelf space and for the environment because it wastes plastic and water. Walmart imposed a requirement for all detergent to be two times concentrated in order to liberate shelf space, thus saving, as they like to point out, more than 400 million gallons of water (that’s 100 million showers!) and 95 million pounds of plastic resin over three years. Considering that they sell one quarter of all the detergent in the United States, the annual savings of a switch from 1x to 2x concentration nationally would be 530 million gal of water and 126 million pounds plastic.

It’s great to hear about a large corporation taking a green initiative, but what this story leaves implicit is that, even when reduced by half, the detergent industry uses 126 million pounds of plastic and 530 million gallons of water each year. We all know that water is a precious resource, but plastic just gets recycled anyway, right? Wrong. According to the EPA, the recycling rate for HDPE bottles (that’s the type of plastic detergent jugs are made of) is only 28 percent. In other words, out of 126 million pounds of detergent container plastic per year, 90 million pounds end up in landfills or worse.

We’d say that’s 90 million good reasons to switch to Dizolve.